lobster, bacon and gruyère crustless quiche

lobster bacon gruyere crustless quiche | movita beaucoup

Happy birthday, Isa! I hope you’re having a marvellous day. I’m not even going to whine about the frigid temperatures and snow we’ve got here. I’m almost happy that you’re frolicking in the daffodils.

Rosie Beaucoup was kind enough to share your crustless quiche recipe with me, and I made some in your honour. You might have noticed that I made your French treat a little more Canadian unhealthy, as I’m wont to do. I figured you’d appreciate the addition of some Nova Scotian lobster on your special day, and that Adopamop would like the bacon I threw in there. This way, both you and my brother win. Which I know is important to you, since you’re the most competitive human beings on the planet.

lobster bacon gruyere crustless quiche | movita beaucoup

Fun fact: what we think of as the classic French quiche actually originated in Germany. Not that it matters. It’s not a competition. Also, the word quiche is derived from the German word for cake: kuchen. So basically, quiche is cake, which sounds better than: egg custard. You probably won’t admit that though, as you’d have to let the Germans win on the whole quiche-is-cake thing, and I know that’s not likely to happen.

Now, given that there are four of you in your house, you could probably cut this birthday kuchen quiche into 8 pieces in order to avoid battles over equal distribution. 12 slices would also work, but I’d avoid a number like 10 if at all possible. Mostly because you’ve birthed two of the most competitive children on the planet. 

lobster bacon gruyere crustless quiche | movita beaucoup

As I’m sure you know, this quiche makes a lovely meal or the perfect brunch treat. Crustless quiche is super easy to throw together – even if you’ve got my brother and two kids to keep in line. In my particular version, the succulent lobster is complimented by the salty bacon. The gruyère gets all melty and doesn’t overpower the other flavours in any way. Also, no crust. Who needs it? Not me. Nope. No way.

So, my sweet, French friend, I hope you have a winning day. You deserve it.

And after seeing how you people deal with defeat on Family Game Night, I’d say we’ve all earned it.

lobster bacon gruyere crustless quiche | movita beaucoup

. . .

I’ve included two recipes below – one for Isa’s Crustless Quiche which can be treated as a master recipe and adapted with your favourite cheese and add-ins, and my recipe for lobster quiche which is more likely to kill you. (You don’t have to pick a favourite. It’s not a competition.) Though best when devoured fresh from the oven, leftover quiche can be stored in the fridge and gently rewarmed in the microwave.

. . .

Isa’s Crustless Quiche (Master Recipe)

recipe: Isabelle Lecroart

print and make

Yields one 9-inch quiche.

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • pinch salt
  • black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup cheese of your choice (cheddar, swiss, gruyère, blue cheese)
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups diced vegetables or other add-in of choice (mushrooms, pepper, onion, ham)

Mise en place – begin by getting organized. Read through the entire recipe before beginning. Measure out all of your ingredients. This recipe is endlessly adaptable – use your favourite cheese and add-ins of your choice!

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9-inch quiche, pie plate or baking pan.

In a large bowl, beat the eggs lightly with a whisk, ensuring that the yolks and whites are well combined. Add the milk and whisk well to combine. Whisk in the salt and pepper, and then the flour (a little at a time), until no lumps remain.

Stir in the cheese, diced vegetables and/or other add-ins.

Pour into prepared pan and bake for 40-45 minutes. The quiche is done when golden on the edges (and slightly golden on top), firm, and the centre is set/not wet. The quiche will rise a little during baking, and the settle a little as it cools.

Allow to cool for about 5 minutes and serve warm.

. . .

Lobster, Bacon and Gruyère Crustless Quiche

print and make

Yields one 9-inch quiche.

  • 4 strips bacon
  • 1/2 cup diced shallot
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 cup grated gruyère
  • 1 1/2 cup chopped, cooked lobster

Mise en place – begin by getting organized. Read through the entire recipe before beginning. Measure out all of your ingredients.

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9-inch quiche, pie plate or baking pan.

Place bacon in a skillet and cook until crisp over medium-low to medium heat. Remove the bacon, and allow drain on paper towel. Once cool enough to handle, dice or crumble the bacon into small pieces and set aside.

Drain the fat from the skillet and then cook the diced shallot in the same pan for 1-2 minutes – to soften slightly.  Remove from pan and set aside.

In a large bowl, beat eggs lightly with whisk, ensuring that the yolks and whites are well combined. Add the milk and whisk well to combine. Whisk in the salt and pepper, and then the flour (a little at a time), until no lumps remain.

Stir in the cheese, lobster, bacon and shallot.

Pour into prepared pan and bake for 40-45 minutes. The quiche is done when golden on the edges (and slightly golden on top), firm, and the centre is set/not wet. The quiche will rise a little during baking, and the settle a little as it cools.

Allow to cool for about 5 minutes and serve warm.

26 Responses to lobster, bacon and gruyère crustless quiche

  1. Cindy March 15, 2014 at 9:55 am #

    WOW this looks yummm. I’ll have to find something to substitute for the flour since I don’t eat flour/grains, but I will be trying this recipe. The combination of flavors has my mouth watering in anticipation already!

  2. bellini March 15, 2014 at 10:47 am #

    Lobster sur does up the ante on what I have always thought was very French dish. Who knew.

  3. themondaybox March 15, 2014 at 1:10 pm #

    Years ago, I started making quiche crustless for lo carb reasons but have continued to make it crustless over the years because it turns out we prefer it that way! No crunchy (or soggy) crust to get in the way of that delicious egg custard with add-ins filling! Lobster, bacon, and gruyere sound fabulous! I see nothing unhealthy at all with your Canadian version. 🙂 The nutrition police can add a salad.

    • movita beaucoup March 16, 2014 at 9:46 am #

      Crust just fills your belly up with… crust, which limits the space for better tasting stuff. It should be illegal.

  4. Karen @ Karen's Kitchen Stories March 15, 2014 at 1:33 pm #

    I love the instruction to read all the way through before beginning. I tend to forget that part when I’m making dinner, until I get to the part that says “refrigerate overnight.” Doh! This is beautiful btw.

    • movita beaucoup March 16, 2014 at 9:47 am #

      Or: preheat oven, followed by: let dough chill overnight. GAH!

  5. lorrielorrieb March 15, 2014 at 3:57 pm #

    I would so love that if I could eat lobster! But I guess there is no reason why I can’t just make it sans lobster. Cause bacon, cheese and egg are all still my friends!

    • movita beaucoup March 16, 2014 at 9:48 am #

      Just thinking of your lobster-free existence makes me cry. But yes! There are so many options! Go forth and quiche…

  6. mellissa @ ibreatheimhungry March 15, 2014 at 7:06 pm #

    So much delicious in one dish! Of course this is right up my low carb alley too which is awesome! I’m more than a little jealous that you live in lobster heaven and get to eat it all the time. They probably practically give that stuff away where you are. I can see it now… “Hey 2.0 let’s have PB&J’s for dinner” .. “Nyah, Movita let’s get lobster – it’s cheaper.”

    I hate you.

  7. Melissa@EyesBigger March 15, 2014 at 7:38 pm #

    Basically, I could have lived without this and been ok. Until I saw Gruyere and then… well… ok… NOW I HAVE TO HAVE IT. I think you should make me something for my birthday. Not that I’m asking, or begging but, it seems like you make really good birthday things. #justsayin

  8. girl in a food frenzy March 15, 2014 at 8:55 pm #

    Lobster is so lavish. It’s a beautiful ingredient to incorporate to your recipe. The perfect special occasion dish!

  9. Maureen | Orgasmic Chef March 16, 2014 at 4:19 am #

    What an elegant lunch. I’d be proud to serve that to the Pope himself. 🙂

  10. bocafrau March 16, 2014 at 11:34 am #

    I love quiche and these two recipes sound super delicious. I may actually make some right now as a little brunch treat for the family! And thanks for the history lesson, I had no idea that it (or the words) originated in Germany… very interesting! You l=know what’s also interesting – my German parents owning a French restaurant in America!!! 🙂

  11. Pamela @ Brooklyn Farm Girl March 16, 2014 at 7:21 pm #

    This looks so elegant with the lobster and so comforting with that cheese! Big time yum.

  12. bakerbynature March 16, 2014 at 7:35 pm #

    Hello, gorgeous! This is one dreamy quiche!!!

  13. Averie @ Averie Cooks March 17, 2014 at 7:06 am #

    Lobster, gruyere, eggs, hubba hubba, this is some seriously awesome comfort food! Pinnnnned! 🙂

  14. shannon March 17, 2014 at 1:58 pm #

    yes to all the things in this quiche, or “egg cake,” as i may now refer to quiche. I’m thrilled you left off the crust: any quiches that happen here are sans crust, because truly: it just gets in the way. Now if only someone would send me some Nova Scotian lobster…

    oooh, and i hate that too, with the “preheat oven OH WAIT: CHILL OVERNIGHT” instructions in some recipes. why. WHYYYYY do people do that. Even professional cookbooks i have contain that dire and unforgivable mistake.

  15. Nancy @ gottagetbaked March 17, 2014 at 3:46 pm #

    If that lobster quiche recipe is going to kill me, it’d be a pretty happy way for me to go. Seriously. I’d die with a belly full of everything good and delicious and holy in this world (lobster, bacon, eggs, cream, cheese. Bam) and with a giant smile on my face. I love this!

  16. whatjessicabakednext March 17, 2014 at 4:02 pm #

    This looks divine! Quiche is always one of my favourite things to eat! 🙂

  17. natalie @ wee eats March 17, 2014 at 6:40 pm #

    I’m not saying it’s a competition, but I’m pretty sure lobster quiche won. I will let you know for sure after our next brunch.

  18. emma March 18, 2014 at 8:00 am #

    If four slices of bacon split over four people split again over two servings each is capable of killing me, I don’t know what’s safe anymore.

  19. themessybakerblog March 18, 2014 at 11:51 am #

    Two recipes for the price of one–whoop, whoop! Squirrel and my dad are always competing over who’s the best at Uno and Sorry. It’s an ongoing argument. This quiche looks amazing. Everything is bettah with bacon. I think we can all agree.

  20. Lynne Knowlton March 20, 2014 at 10:37 pm #

    Errmergerd. I think this would be best enjoyed if I just came to your house and you made it for me. Stamped it.

  21. Janet Bradley May 28, 2014 at 2:23 pm #

    Can I use Crab instead of Lobster?

    • movita beaucoup May 28, 2014 at 2:58 pm #

      Janet, I’ve only tested the recipe as posted, but I can’t imagine you’d have any trouble with crab. That said, I don’t ever give personal recommendations unless I’ve tried it myself. I’d love to hear back from you if you give it a try!

  22. movita beaucoup December 28, 2015 at 11:06 am #

    Comments on this post are now closed as it was published in March 2014. Thanks for stopping by!

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